16-things-you-should-do-on-social-media-to-stand-out

With the rise of instant communication, technological advances, and fast-paced lifestyles, observation of common etiquette practices is taking a backseat. A whole new batch of rules for polite behavior is rising up to accommodate the changing times. More often than not, the public seems to blatantly ignore the fact that courtesy and chivalry still exist. Don’t be a part of this travesty any longer! Even seemingly harmless etiquette blunders can seriously damage your image. Educate yourself on the latest etiquette insights and your image will become increasingly polished and refined.

Social Media Photo Etiquette– We’ve all been there. That awkward moment when someone has tweeted, posted, or instagrammed a picture of you that you prefer to be buried in a time capsule with no expiration date. The etiquette golden rule to follow when posting photos to the Internet is to “upload photos of others as you would have them upload photos of you.” Even if you look great in the picture and it’s unflattering to your friend, try cropping the photo. It is important to maintain an image of consideration, and tactfully uploading photos to the Internet is a small thing that will go a long way in the way that people see you.

Smartphone Etiquette– In the grand scheme of things, the Iphone is a pretty new invention. However, it is an invention that has prospered and multiplied to the point where it’s as if it has always existed. How could we google where the nearest Walmart is? How could we find out the Sunday hours of the restaurant we are craving? However, with great power comes great responsibility and we must still hold ourselves accountable to being courteous with our cell phones.

Most people think the vibrate setting is the polite mode when in the company of others. This is a total misconception. That constant buzzing noise can be just as irritating as an actual ringtone. Shutting your phone completely off is a little extreme, but setting your phone to silent enables you to still have access to your device without being rude. When you are socializing with other people, obsessively checking your phone can really hurt your image by seeming disinterested and absent from your real-life conversation. Check your messages sparingly and only answer if absolutely necessary. If you’re at dinner or a movie, just put your phone away entirely for a few hours. Use common sense and be considerate of how your cell phone use might be affecting others.

Facebook Etiquette– Facebook is one of those things that can do some serious damage to your image. The entire concept is based around image and how your image is communicated to the public. You do not want your image to consist of what you ate for lunch and how mad you are at your significant other. The number one Facebook etiquette rule is to avoid TMI (too much information). Facebook statuses should be reserved for particularly important updates or announcements, not every passing thought in your head. If you do not abide by this rule, you will easily become the target of mockery and possible de-friending. Keep your private life to yourself and think carefully about what you want your public image to say about you.

Adding random strangers on Facebook is also an etiquette gaffe. You risk coming off as extremely forward and socially inept. If you have never met the person, but have mutual friends, it would be appropriate to send a message along with your friend request explaining how you know of them.

Don’t go crazy with the “like” button. This feature should mostly be used with your close friends and family. Liking everything a casual acquaintance posts can appear a little invasive. Even though Facebook is a public sphere, unspoken privacy lines are still drawn. In addition, appearing too consumed with Facebook can leave people wondering whether something is lacking in your real life. Let Facebook positively promote your image by keeping these etiquette tips in mind.


 

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